E-mails and comments welcome from teachers and learners of all ages.  
June 23, 2004
Muslim homeschooling a further comment

A comment has recently been added to this posting about Muslim homeschooling, from way back in 2002. I said I was in favour of it. Corey writes as follows:

Hi Everyone,

I think this is a good discussion. I like the freedoms involved in homeschooling my kids. I really support everyone's freedoms to do this. I happen to be a Muslim and even though I wear the headscarf, I am by no stretch an extremist. I have quite liberal views about human rights and social justice and as a Muslim I plan to give my kids more than just a religious education. In fact we'll focus on secular materials most of the time. (The nice thing about homeschooling is that we can still observe our 5 daily prayers together) and I'll be able to teach them some history that wouldn't be available as curriculum in public school. Our public schools over here are very overcrowded and riddled with gangs, drugs and the like. I think, as an educated woman I can find many resources to enrich my children more so than the public school. Even though I'll be homeschooling, I will especially teach my children respect for other people's belief systems and cultures. I feel very committed to that. I think that most people, no matter what religion they are or what culture they come from, try to teach cooperation and acceptance. Lately, there has been a lot of post September 11 backlash against the Muslim community. These hate-crimes and incidents have targetted many school children. Parents really appreciate the option to homeschool, especially if they feel that their child is in danger.

Corey might also be interested in this more recent posting on the same topic.

Posted by Brian Micklethwait at 11:40 PM
Category: Home education
[1]
Comments

I don't understand this obsession with home schooling. What is so good about depriving children of the best opportunity they have for practicing their skills in dealing with other people?

Comment by: ian on June 24, 2004 01:11 PM

Ian, what makes you think homeschoolers don't deal with other people? My children have a wider range of friends, companions, and acquaintances -- of all ages -- than most schooled kids. They see more of the real world on a weekly basis than most schooled kids do in a month or more. Where is the deprivation? With all of our activities -- and we are by no means atypical -- it's sometimes more like overload.

Have you ever sought out a group of homeschoolers to see exactly what it is they do?

Comment by: Tim Haas on June 24, 2004 02:28 PM

I had a spell of home-schooling as a child - because of illness - and it was the most depressing and lonely period of my life bar none.

Plus it seems rather dififcult - indeed pointless - to replicate a chemistry lab in the spare room.

I'm not agin the idea - it just seems plain daft.

Comment by: ian on June 24, 2004 05:33 PM

...and of course if you are a group of homeschoolers are you not running a school - albeit one without a building?

PS the Turing thingy is playing up again - this is my third attempt

Comment by: ian on June 24, 2004 05:36 PM

What is so good about depriving children of the best opportunity they have for practicing their skills in dealing with other people?
...

I had a spell of home-schooling as a child - because of illness - and it was the most depressing and lonely period of my life bar none.

I hope that your not assuming that your own bad experience would be replicated by everyone else.

I had about a month or two of home-schooling when I was 13, after I'd had an operation. In that time I learnt nearly all of the two years worth of the maths and physics courses, and most of the chemistry one as well. When I returned to school, I found myself playing the role of what might be described as a classroom assistant, often tutoring other pupils in the problems that we had been set. I have come to the conclusion that for at least for some people, school is a waste of time.

I read a report somewhere that the common belief, especially popular amongst teachers' unions, that home-schooled children are inadequately socialised is nonsense. I'll post up the link to it, if I find it again.

Some reasons for home-schooling include to escape bullying from other children; dissatisfaction with the quality, or cirriculum of local schools; to provide an education tailored to suit your own child, rather than one designed for the average child; and the point Brian has made: what do think is more likely to be taken over by Ismalist extremists, Muslim schools or Muslim families?

Plus it seems rather dififcult - indeed pointless - to replicate a chemistry lab in the spare room.

There isn't any reason why the entirety of a home-schooled child's education should be conducted in the home. If the subjects require expensive equipment, some parents might home-school their children only for their primary education, others might home-school part-time, and normal-school part-time (I believe this happens in some places).

...if you are a group of homeschoolers are you not running a school - albeit one without a building?

I thought that was explicit in the name. You are running a school, and the building is your home.

Comment by: Andy Wood on June 25, 2004 10:36 AM

Can't reply - comments system broken for anything more than this

Comment by: ian on June 25, 2004 04:48 PM

I think home-schooling offers a lot of advantages in the modern day life. You may finish school or graduate from the university stydying in the comfort of your home.

Comment by: Diploma Teacher on July 29, 2004 04:43 PM
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