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Category archive: Signs and notices

Tuesday November 10 2015



I’ve not been out much lately, but last Friday night I got to see Perry and Adriana’s new version of indoors.  That was the best photo I took, of a drying up cloth.

Click on that to see Adriana’s trousers, of the sort that are presumably threatening all the time to get tighter.

Friday October 23 2015

Earlier in the week, I journeyed under Trafalgar Square, in a pedestrian subway.  The subway was adorned with history lessons, one of which was this one:


I did not know this, about what a Mews is.  It’s not the kind of thing you ask.  By which I mean: I never have.  A Mews is a Mews.  I have never questioned this.  I accepted it.  And then someone answers the question: Why is a Mews called that?  Before I even realised I was ready to be told.

Click on the above picture, and get the darker and less artfully composed original.

Tuesday October 13 2015

Here are the last pictures from my trip to Richmond last week that I’ll be showing you.  They are both of a house.

No cranes.  No roof clutter.  No scaffolding.  No white vans.  No taxis.  No Big Things in the background.  No me, reflected in it.  Nobody else photoing it, or even doing a painting of it.

Just a house, and some leaves:


But not any old house.  It was once the home of Henrietta Howard, Mistress of His Maj King George 2.  How do I know this?  From this sign:


Click on that if you don’t believe me and the above picture is too small for you to read properly.

Tip for when you are out and about photoing.  Take pictures of signs. That way you record not only what you saw, but what it was.  Maybe you won’t care about that in five or ten or twenty years time, if and when you are looking back through your pictures.  Maybe “P1250679.JPG” will be enough for you.  But maybe it won’t.

Monday October 05 2015

Photoed by me last night, at Southwark tube station:


Next to the ticket barrier at Southwark tube there are a number of these little history lessons, of which this was my favourite.  This is the kind of thing you can usually chase up quickly on the internet, and find a fuller account of.  But, my googling abilities are such that I can find no reference to this fish-discouragement story.  Anyone?

Saturday October 03 2015

Here being Epping Underground Station, which is not actually underground, but you know what I mean.

As already recounted here, I was recently in Epping.  But I just looked again at the photos I took that day and realised that, fascinating though the M11 is, this sign is even more interesting:


I did not know there was such a thing as the Epping Way.  But there is.  It is 82 miles long.  Did you already know about this “way”, from Epping to Harwich?  I didn’t.

This is not really a case of “blog and learn”, but blogging did help, because as so often I was looking for something interesting to pass on.  Which meant I first had to learn something more about it besides its name on a sign.

I also like the photo.  Without photography I would have completely forgotten about this.

When I was at Essex University, I used to go there from London by train, or by car, or by bus.  Now I learn that I could have walked, by what would presumably have mostly been a rather scenic route.

Tuesday September 15 2015

It’s been a very bad last few days here at BMdotcom.  First there was the domain name fiasco, and then last night and into this morning there was another interruption, caused by a power cut in a totally different part of London to me, which was in its turn caused by all that rain we had recently.  And then the interruption was prolonged by the mishandling of this power cut by my rather creeky and out-of-date version of Expression Engine.  The two events were unrelated.  I think there’s a Macbeth quote that deals with this kind of thing.  One of those plays about a king for whom things are starting to go badly wrong.  But rest assured that there is no sign that BMdotcom is about to be dethroned permanently.

So anyway, here is one of those photo-postings made quick and easy by my “I just like them!” directory.

I just like this, taken in 2007:


And I just like this, taken a month ago:


That second one was already edited and ready to post, with its new name, but I don’t believe I ever got around to actually displaying it.  If I did, well, take another look.

I do not promise more substantial stuff tomorrow, but I do hope for it.

Friday August 28 2015

Incoming photo (which is something I like a lot), from Simon Gibbs, of a sign (I like signs a lot), near Southwark Cathedral:


Click on that to get the bigger, unhorizontalised picture, and read more about what this is about here.  Google sends me regular links to anything that is “new architecture london”, and there’s been lots written about this place.

Although, rather oddly, I couldn’t find any pictures of this sign.  Maybe this will change that.

The gimmick is that this is a pub that sprays alcohol into the air.  That was always going to be catnip to the media, social and regular.  “Breathe responsibly”.  Arf, arf. There are already plenty of pictures around of that sign.

Sunday August 16 2015

Last month, on the 22nd (thank you my camera), a friend took me to see a show consisting, in the first half, of improvised comedy, and in the second half of pre-written sketch comedy.  This was at a venue called the Proud Archivist (thank you me for photoing the sign saying that).

The core skill of the performers who were performing that night was improvisation, and it showed, part two being a rather severe disappointment after the often considerable excellence of part one.  The sort of sketches they did in part two needed to be done with detached and unrealistic faithfulness to the text, Footlights/Monty Python style, almost like you are reading the lesson in church, not “realistically”, as these performers tried to do.  But all it sounded like was that they had forgotten the damn words.  (I heard later that they included some improvisation in some of the sketches.  That was when this dire effect was at its most severe, or so I presume.)

But best of all, which as far as I was concerned made the entire expedition totally worthwhile, was the extraordinary light outside, for a few fleeting minutes during the interval, outside being where I went during the interval.

Here are two of the photos I took from just outside the Proud Archivist, next to the canal, during that interval:


Okay, what was photoed there is nothing out of the ordinary, with the second picture just being a close-up selection from the bigger picture displayed in the first.  But the light!  Photography is light, and that is light! Or, it was.  Do you at least get a hint of what it was like actually to have been there, then?  Hope so.

Tuesday August 11 2015

Photoed by me this afternoon, in Victoria Street:


That’s right. You can drive straight at us pedestrians and we will always see you, because we look both ways.  We pedestrians have eyes in the backs of our heads.

Many signs exhort people to be more vigilant, or else disaster will ensue.  But here is a sign that says: relax.  When it comes to cars in their vicinity, pedestrians are omniscient.  There may seem to be a problem, with cars driving about, seeming to threaten pedestrians.  But actually, no.  No problemo.

Seriously?  What this sign shows is that sometimes, just sometimes, exclamation marks have their uses, not just to enable you to shout in writing, but to say something different.  Without punctuation, this sign is a bit ambiguous.  It does the job, but maybe it could do that job better.  To a pedant like me, it suggests that what merely should happen, is already happening.  With punctuation, the sign could be made unambiguous.

Pedestrians!  Look both ways!

Trouble is, that would set a precedent, for using shouty punctuation even when it is not needed to clarify meaning.

Friday August 07 2015

More and more, I find myself interested in not only architecture but vehicles.  Time was when I would always wait for vehicles to move out of the way, while I took photos of more properly photographic things, like buildings.  But vehicles are also interesting.  It is interesting, for instance, that most of the photographers I like to observe still regard vehicles only as an aesthetic interruption, rather than as being worthy of aesthetic reflection in their own right.

A particular category of vehicle I have recently been hoovering up with my Lumix FZ200 is “black cabs that aren’t actually black”.  I chose this particular specimen because this is Friday and there is a big cat involved:


For Londoners, it’s an obvious fact, a fact not worth discussing, that whereas many black cabs are indeed black, many are not.  But how many of those unfortunates who do not live in London, or who do not even visit London regularly, or who may never have visited London, know that black cabs aren’t necessarily black?  Such persons may be interested by this, to them, unobvious fact.

Okay, not so very interesting, especially if you are a Londoner.  But what do you make of this car?:


I photoed that soon after photoing the bald selfie stick guy in this earlier posting.

As it sped away I took another photo of this car, which was very blurry but which did just about tell me what its very distinct number plate was.  And I can definitely tell you that the car is this car.  It’s an example of something called “car wrapping”, whatever that may be.  Comments anyone?

Even weirder is this car, which I photoed yesterday afternoon, in Victoria Street, soon after photoing the taxi in picture number one above:


What on earth is that?  The www told me nothing.

I note that this weirdmobile has a distinctly Middle Eastern flavour to it, including what looked (in other blurrier pictures) like quite a lot of Middle Eastern writing on it, in among the English verbiage.  But what it all means, or what kind of service is being sold or publicised, I have no idea.  Again: can anyone tell me more?

Tuesday July 28 2015

Certainly in London and I presume everywhere else in Britain, when you see lots of verbiage attached to the outside of a building site, it tends to be health and safety stuff, of the sort shown in this posting, which I did here in February 2011.  (That was the very first posting I did with the category “Signs and notices” attached to it.)

In the summer of that same year, I was in France, where I took the picture that follows.  But I never got around to displaying it here.  Here it is now:


This is a sign that I saw adorning the outside of a French building site.

To me, it resembles nothing so much as the credits at the end of a movie.  Every imaginable contributor to the building process is painstakingly listed.  Click if you want to be able to read everything more clearly.

Although I am sure I might be persuaded otherwise (for instance by people with knowledge of the relative merits of the actual work that tends to be done in each country), I think the contrast is rather in France’s favour.

In France, everything that has been done, and by whom, is listed.  Presumably it has been done in a manner to make the people who did it glad to have their names in, as it were, lights.  In Britain, every imaginable thing that might go wrong is listed, in the form of an imprecation that people not do this.  It’s the difference between being proud of what is being done, and being nothing but apologetic about it.

Right at the end, though, it does say: “chantier interdet au public, port du casque obligatoire”.  This means (unless the internet has gravely deceived me): “access forbidden to the public, helmet obligatory”.  So, a bit of health and safety nagging there.  But that’s all there is.

In Britain, you also sometimes get a rather shorter list of the grander and more professional of the enterprises and people who are doing the job, but not nearly so much is made of this, compared to all the stuff about being ever so, ever so careful.

Friday July 24 2015

When G(od)D(aughter) 1 and I left the Park View Cafe, the weather was still grim, as you can see in this picture, which is of an amazing building which we encountered just a few yards down the road:


I was amazed.  But so amazed enough that I forgot to take a closer photo of all that signage so I could look it up later.

What is it?  And more to the point, what was it?  Because nobody says “We need a place to do indoor pretend rock climbing” and builds themselves something like that.

Well, here is the website for what it is now.  And here you can read about what it was originally built to accommodate:

For a small district, Stoke Newington is endowed with a generous amount of open space. To its north, there is the extensive West Reservoir, now a non-working facility, but open for leisure and surrounded by greenspace, at the entrance to which is the architecturally bizarre Castle Climbing Centre, once the main Water Board pumping station. It was designed, by William Chadwell Mylne, to look like a towering Scottish castle.

There should be more fake castles of this sort.  Why don’t people build such things now?  You’d think with all the current fascination with fantasy movies, Harry Potter, and so forth, there’d be rock and roll royalty queueing up to erect more stuff like this.  Do they not even try?  Or, do they try, but are they then rebuffed by boring local planning committees, frightened that if they allowed such things, before you knew it, everyone would be building whatever they liked.

“Castle Climbing Centre” ought to mean a Centre where you learn to Climb Castles.  But, it doesn’t.

Friday June 19 2015

I’ve been giving attention to and often photoing white vans lately, and am starting to notice interesting things about them, of which more in due course.  (Maybe.  I promise nothing.)

But meanwhile, Fridays here have not, lately, seen much in the cat category, which is a thing I like to do on Friday.

So, a picture of a white van with a picture of a cat on it would seem to be in order. 

I have yet to photograph such a thing myself, but I did find just such a picture of just such a white van, here.  But alas, the cat was on it for a not very internetty sort of reason:


There’s lots of cat related stuff on the www, but this is an aspect of cats and the keeping of them that typically gets omitted.  All is cuteness.  Spaying is ... not cute.

Tuesday May 26 2015

Take a train from … anywhere, into Waterloo.  Exit your train, and go through the barriers.  Turn right in the big concourse and carry on walking until you have gone as far as you can go, and you get to an exit.  Step outside.  You are in “Station Approach”:


I’ve messed with the visuals there, to make “Station Approach” readable.

You are wisely prevented by some railings from stepping out into Station Approach itself and being run down by a taxi.  But turn right out of the exit, and make your way a few dozen yards along the narrow pavement, to the point in Station Approach where you can cross the road, to some steps that lead down into “Spur Road”.  (The steps are right next to the S of Spur Road, in the image above.) But, don’t go down these steps.  Stay at the top of the steps and enjoy the view.

To the far left, you can see the Walkie Talkie.  To the far right, the Spray Can.  Between them is the sprawl of south-of-the-river London.

It’s one of my favourite London panoramas, if only because everyone else who ever sets foot in this place is either in a hurry to get somewhere else, or in a hurry to catch a train.  Nobody talks about this view, the way they do of the view from such places as Parliament Hill or the top of some of London’s big or even not so big buildings

What stops this view being talked up as a “view” is the prominence of all the foreground clutter.  In the background, there are Big Things to be observed, but they do not tower over the foreground.  If anything, the foreground clutter dominates them.  Even the Shard is an almost diffident, even sometimes (depending on the light) spectral presence rather than a “tower”.  Recently there was a TV documentary about the Tower of London, and the impact of it and the Shard, each in and on their time, was compared.  The message was that the Tower then was like the Shard now.  But these two buildings could hardly be more different.  The Tower then was telling London then that the Tower was the boss.  The Shard now politely concedes to London now that London is the boss.

And of course I love this view, because I love London’s clutter, especially roof clutter, and I love it when Big Things can be seen between and beyond the clutter, without necessarily dominating:

image imageimage image

Those shots were all taken within moments of one another, just over a week ago, on a sunny afternoon, the same sunny afternoon I took this.

Stations are great linear photo-opportunities.  This is because railway tracks have to be pretty much dead level.  If the lie of the land is high, the tracks have to be lower, and if the lie of the land is low, the tracks have to be higher, which is also convenient because it enables the railway to jump over the roads on bridges and viaducts rather than compete with them at such things as level crossings.  This causes the platforms of many a station to be at roof level rather than at ground level.

Level crossings will get road traffic across a mere double track out in the country, but are hopeless for getting past the tracks out of Waterloo, one of the world’s busiest railway stations.  The traffic would wait for ever.  So, bridges and viaducts it is, and that means that Waterloo Station itself is dragged up to regular London roof level.  So even if you can’t see anything from Waterloo Station itself, you can from just outside it.  You can from Station Approach.  Well, I can, because I want to.

Saturday May 09 2015

Spent day doing other things, so quota photo time, but from the archives:


Taken in June 2005.  I don’t understand mobile phones, but presumably things have changed since the above arrangements were advertised.

But how about that war that either Britain, or Europe, had with France?  I don’t remember that.  Seriously, I wonder what on earth that was about.